marycatelli: (Default)
The fun thing about writing little vignettes is that they may call for a first-person point-of-view who gets to make comments and express attitudes in a way a third-person narrator can't, but. . .

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marycatelli: (A Birthday)
I began an outline, as I begin so many, with only the vaguest ideas about what would happen next.  That is, after all, why I outline, to make sure that something does happen next. . . .

Amazing, how much I mentally revised without actually changing the outline.  It comes out very clearly when I go to actually write the outline.
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marycatelli: (A Birthday)
Opening a story -- introducing this element and that -- and trying to remember that he's done that before. He's not new to school, to the beginning of the spring term, to the post he holds. . . .

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marycatelli: (Cat)
A plotline is starting to come clear to me.  The reason why one character is talking with the main character -- in her arch unpleasant way -- is that she realizes that certain people who threw her out of their plan in the early stages went on with it, and wants to use her as a spanner in the works.

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marycatelli: (East of the Sun)
Here is the character, newly arrived on the scene.  Here are some characters who are friendly and curious and perfeclty willing to lecture her at length about all the things she's wondering about.  True, they want to hear about her start too. . . .
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marycatelli: (Galahad)
The story starts with our heroine passing out posters to urchins, to hang them about the city streets for a fee.  The author is unhappy because --

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marycatelli: (Rapunzel)
Read yet another urban fantasy with overt magic -- and so, of course, the admission that it's not the streets we know, it's an alternate history.  It may be a factor of selection, but it seems to me that they are increasing in number.

Long tradition of that.  Back to before the time when they called it urban fantasy.  Robert A. Heinlein's "Magic, Incorporated," and Poul Anderson's Operation Chaos are classics of the genre.

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marycatelli: (A Birthday)
Was further pondering the problems of fully adult characters as the protagonist of fantasy adventures. . . .

There are the professionals.  People whose jobs are adventures. . . the canonical heroes of sword and sorcery, to be sure. . . but there are issues even with traveling mercenaries.

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marycatelli: (Rapunzel)
Always revise stories at a canter before the end.  That way, you can catch inconsistencies.  Like, having the characters at one point notice trees that have exploded from cold (extreme cold) and shortly thereafter go to take refuge among trees.

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marycatelli: (A Birthday)
One thing I think was inadequate in Deathly Hallows, and thought so the first time, was in the scene where Snape gave up his memories.

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marycatelli: (Strawberries)
You shouldn't slap a significant detail into a story and then forget about it.  If you give a character background and motivations, the readers expect that character to be more than wallpaper for one scene, if you have a newspaper and mention titles, the readers expect at least one article to be significant, if you plant a gun in the scene, the readers expect it to be fired -- and by the end of Act 3.

That  goes for themes too.  Some issues can be touched on -- just as some details can , but others need to be grappled with, or ignored entirely.

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marycatelli: (God Speed)
Among the things that are not the adventures of writing -- how to explain the constitutional limits of the main character's powers.

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marycatelli: (Cat)
There are shadows creeping about the city at night. . . not those attached to feet. . . .

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marycatelli: (God Speed)
plugging through the story, reflecting on what the heroine is thinking about. . . .

Well, there's what she should be thinking about, and conscientiously is.  Considering that covers both her official duties, and the secret but vital tasks, far more crucial than the official ones, that does indeed give her much to think about.

Meanwhile, she's in love.

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growing up

Nov. 14th, 2014 11:43 pm
marycatelli: (A Birthday)
One heroine of mine starts out on her story -- not actually the day of her birth, but close, very close, the feast at which she acquires her name.

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marycatelli: (A Birthday)
So off goes our heroine and her companion to breakfast, and over the breakfast table, another character starts to tell them a story. . . .
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marycatelli: (Roman Campagna)
A few weeks in the lab can often save you a couple of hours in the library.

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marycatelli: (Rapunzel)

I was thinking of monsters in opposing pairs, and concluding that to pitch up against a unicorn, the obvious thing would be a poisonous snake.

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